Speaking Creativity

Larry Robertson is an Innovation Advisor who works, writes, and guides at the nexus of creativity, leadership, and entrepreneurship.

He is the author of 2 award-winning books – “The Language of Man. Learning to Speak Creativity” and “A Deliberate Pause: Entrepreneurship and its Moment in Human Progress”. Larry is also a columnist for Inc. Magazine for The Innovator’s Edge and for The Creativity Post on Learning to Speak Creativity. As founder of Lighthouse Consulting, he has for over 25 years guided entrepreneurial ventures and their leaders through growth to lasting practice-noticersuccess.

His experience has provided him a unique viewpoint on the nature of creativity and how to tap into its strength to propel your professional and personal life forward. Larry shares his two tips for rediscovering the creative within all of us: practice noticing and think in questions. These seemingly simple ideas can free your mind to explore ideas that don’t exist and become a true innovator.

Listen in as we dive into what makes creativity creative and how hitting roadblocks can improve your innovative tendencies.

In This Episode:

  • How tracing the root of innovation leads to a focus on creativity
  • Why being creative means forgetting what you’ve been told
  • Tuning into creativity by practicing noticing the little things in life
  • Why cultivating a lively sense of inquiry means thinking in terms of questions
  • Innovation as baby steps instead of moon-leaps

Quotes From This Episode:

Creativity is at the root of any human advancement or form of progress.” —@catalyst4HP

“No one was looking at the patterns across all creativity.” —@catalyst4HP

“Humans have a unique and distinct ability to think about the future… to think of things that have never existed or might exist.” —@catalyst4HP

“There’s a myth about creativity and big creative ideas that they happen in this moon-leap and that’s not at all true.” —@catalyst4HP

H2H Lightning Round:

What’s you holding back from even greater success? Anytime I don’t trust my gut, it limits me in some way.

Who do you look to the most for advice? Rather than who, it’s actually what. I do turn to lots of people for advice but what I look for are patterns across all their answers.

What’s your best personal productivity suggestion? Becoming a practice-noticer.

What is one thing that has you excited to be working on right now? I’m going to be writing a column for Inc. Magazine that is a new format for sharing some of what I know and I’m looking forward to the challenge.

If you had to start over tomorrow knowing what you know now but you can’t take the money with you, what’s the first thing you would do to build your career back up? Be more curious sooner.

Resources: