It’s Not About Perfection

Tamsen Webster is a messaging consultant that has been described as a master chef whose ingredients are words, stories, and emotions.

Part “idea whisperer,” part message strategist, and part presentation coach, Tamsen helps organizations like Disney, Ericsson, Johnson & Johnson, State Street Bank, and Verizon find and communicate the power of their ideas. Working with both individuals and organizations, she helps clients to recognize, and powerfully articulate, what differentiates them in the marketplace — fostering deeper engagement with key audiences and driving business results.

As Executive Producer at TEDxCambridge, Tamsen selects presenters from a diverse group of thinkers, artists, inventors, entrepreneurs, writers, scientists, and teachers—the only common thread being the gravitational pull of their ideas, and their desire to share them on the TEDx stage. She’s also an active speaker and emcee, hired by companies like Akamai, BCG (Boston Consulting Group), and Microsoft, and conferences like Content Marketing World, HubSpot’s INBOUND, and MarketingProfs’ B2B Marketing Forum to not just wow the crowd, but drive them to action.

Listen in as we discuss the secrets to giving a powerful presentation that connects with and impacts audiences of all shapes and sizes.

In This Episode:

  • The four S’s of presentation strategy: substance, structure, style, and stage
  • How an imperfect presentation with errors can be a huge success
  • Why humanizing yourself in front of an audience means making errors and creating connections
  • The importance in preparation for preserving your message and being spontaneous
  • How and why presentations are not sales messaging
  • How creating space for agreement leads to sales without pushing

Quotes From This Episode:

“The most important part is to have clarity about what you’re trying to say at the core and why you’re trying to say it.” —@tamadear

“When you are clear on why you want to talk about it, then that belief and that idea will come through.” —@tamadear

“There is only one truly fatal flaw in speaking and that’s not believing what you say.” —@tamadear

“I know the meaning will survive, no matter what happens, if I’ve done the work ahead of time.” —@tamadear

“You have to do the very non-spontaneous work in order to allow yourself to be spontaneous.” —@tamadear

“People don’t buy what your product or service does. They buy what it means to them.” —@tamadear

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